Ok, all you brilliant metaphysicians out there:  There is a conundrum in my daily life.  And because it's about me, it's way more important than any of the usual blather about dead theosophists.

The background is:  The physician says, "You have to have an emergency surgery to keep from dying a slow painful heavy metal poisoning death."  Naturally, I respond by saying, " Duh, ok."

Last time I had surgery was in 2007 after enduring eight years of progressively worsening bone on bone hip pain.  When I had to resort to using a cane to walk, I finally had the hip replaced.  Three years later, it has "failed" by leaking heavy metals into my blood stream at "alarming" levels.  Thus it must be removed and something more benign put in.  There has been no pain associated with this for the last three years.

After the surgery I came home a day early because everything was progressing well.  I was able to get up and down the stairs with some effort.  THEN, the most remarkable thing happened.  Despite years of thought training and discipline, and the use of pain medications, I experienced honest to goodness 10 out of 10 pain uncontrolled.  I wasn't expecting this.  After a very expensive and painful trip to the emergency room six days post-op, I was finally told by the surgeon's office:  "This is a much more extensive surgery, you are going to have more pain."

There's not a surgeon I know who would plant that in anyone's head BEFORE the surgery.  Now, after 38 years as a nurse and a good thirty years of metaphysical study and practice behind me, I am questioning whether or not maybe we could warn people in some way without programming them to experience pain just because they are expecting it.  If I had known the level of pain could be expected to be so much more severe, I think I might have approached it differently, psychologically and spiritually.

 

Do you have any thoughts about the way the medical community handles the issues of pain and bad outcomes in general?  I have nothing to do but listen to your comments at this time, and would love to know what you think.

ST

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Susan,

Sorry to hear about your relapse into severe pain after surgery. As Paul said, good to see you well enough to post something. I've had my experiences with pain medication, namely codeine and such, but have been off them for a number of years. I don't think the conventional Medical establishment handles patient's pain situations very well, as a general rule.

But, rather than "beat up an old horse," as they say, and get nowhere besides venting, I'd like to suggest you check the website of Dr. Norm Shealy, MD and Ph.D. He's handles lots of different medical situations, but is a pain specialist with over 40 years experience. He's also spiritually and metaphysically oriented. Look it over and maybe contact him. Being a nurse and metaphysically oriented, you could probably communicate with him quite well.

http://www.normshealy.com/

Hope this may be of some help.

 

 


Thank you Paul.  I am looking forward to checking out the website Michael referenced.  Thanks for all your good wishes.  It probably took a lot longer for the spinal painkillers to wear off than would be expected because the heavy metal poisoning had taken a slight toll on the kidneys... that's probably something that could not have been anticipated by anyone.

ST
K. Paul Johnson said:

Dear Susan,

How awful for you to have to go through an ER ordeal so soon after the hospitalization.  I'm glad you're well enough to be able to post.   Post-surgical pain is in my experience a whole different level than anything else, and the kind of relief provided by IV morphine in hospital is also a different level than what you can get at home with pills.  It sounds like the doctors expected the pain to steadily diminish and were unprepared for it to spike many days later.  And yet, they acknowledged that this can happen.  Seems to me like a warning was in order, but it would have to be delivered in a way that wasn't suggestion.

Hoping that mid-April will find you so well you'll forget your awful March,

 

Paul

Thank you Michael.  First thing in the morning I will check out this site.  Good of you to connect me with this.  The experience has had a number of good outcomes already, and I expect more soon, especially since I work with elderly rehab patients.

ST

Michael A. Williams said:

Susan,

Sorry to hear about your relapse into severe pain after surgery. As Paul said, good to see you well enough to post something. I've had my experiences with pain medication, namely codeine and such, but have been off them for a number of years. I don't think the conventional Medical establishment handles patient's pain situations very well, as a general rule.

But, rather than "beat up an old horse," as they say, and get nowhere besides venting, I'd like to suggest you check the website of Dr. Norm Shealy, MD and Ph.D. He's handles lots of different medical situations, but is a pain specialist with over 40 years experience. He's also spiritually and metaphysically oriented. Look it over and maybe contact him. Being a nurse and metaphysically oriented, you could probably communicate with him quite well.

http://www.normshealy.com/

Hope this may be of some help.

 

 

Susan,

Hope things work out in a positive light. Please keep me informed. Best to you!

Susan Thomas said:

Thank you Michael.  First thing in the morning I will check out this site.  Good of you to connect me with this.  The experience has had a number of good outcomes already, and I expect more soon, especially since I work with elderly rehab patients.

ST

Michael A. Williams said:

Susan,

Sorry to hear about your relapse into severe pain after surgery. As Paul said, good to see you well enough to post something. I've had my experiences with pain medication, namely codeine and such, but have been off them for a number of years. I don't think the conventional Medical establishment handles patient's pain situations very well, as a general rule.

But, rather than "beat up an old horse," as they say, and get nowhere besides venting, I'd like to suggest you check the website of Dr. Norm Shealy, MD and Ph.D. He's handles lots of different medical situations, but is a pain specialist with over 40 years experience. He's also spiritually and metaphysically oriented. Look it over and maybe contact him. Being a nurse and metaphysically oriented, you could probably communicate with him quite well.

http://www.normshealy.com/

Hope this may be of some help.

 

 

Death does not move me, but pain does. Seeing someone in extreme pain and not being able to do anything about it, is a feeling I would not wish anyone to experience. The futility of all the so called "kowledge" we hanker after throughout our lives becomes apparent then.

 

During the course of my work with Cancer Patients, I have seen Accupuncture relieve pain more effectively than Morphine. Both are tempoarry though and the pain comes back. In Hospitals pain management is typically handled by Anaesthesists who more often than not, lack the skills for its proper management as it is just an evolving discipline, at least in India.

 

I believe, there are certain medicines available now to block the pain signal to the brain. You may need to consult your treating physicians for that. But, perhpas getting in touch with a good accupuncture clinic in the neighbourhood may be a priority.

 

Thank you.  Have had the offer of acupuncture from a couple of close friends, and will take them up on it.  Have used acupuncture in the past for various maladies with good results.  Had I not been in such a state of shock, I would have had a couple of sessions before the surgery.

Again, thank you so much for your insightful response.

ST

Capt. Anand Kumar said:

Death does not move me, but pain does. Seeing someone in extreme pain and not being able to do anything about it, is a feeling I would not wish anyone to experience. The futility of all the so called "kowledge" we hanker after throughout our lives becomes apparent then.

 

During the course of my work with Cancer Patients, I have seen Accupuncture relieve pain more effectively than Morphine. Both are tempoarry though and the pain comes back. In Hospitals pain management is typically handled by Anaesthesists who more often than not, lack the skills for its proper management as it is just an evolving discipline, at least in India.

 

I believe, there are certain medicines available now to block the pain signal to the brain. You may need to consult your treating physicians for that. But, perhpas getting in touch with a good accupuncture clinic in the neighbourhood may be a priority.

 

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